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Après le cancer

Prendre soin de soi après le cancer

Pendant le traitement, le simple fait de passer chaque journée peut vous demander toute votre énergie, ce qui rend difficile de penser à autre chose, en particulier à la vie après le traitement. Une fois les traitements terminés, de nombreuses personnes éprouvent des émotions mitigées : heureuses que ce soit terminé, mais anxieuses quant à ce que l'avenir leur réserve. Cela peut être une période d’adaptation étonnamment difficile, alors soyez sensible à vos propres besoins. Ne vous attendez pas à toujours vous sentir bien maintenant que vous n'êtes plus sous traitement et prenez le temps dont vous avez besoin pour accepter ce que vous avez vécu.

 

Je suis la preuve vivante – Survivre au mélanome

Le terme « survivant » peut signifier différentes choses pour différentes personnes. Pour certains, un survivant peut avoir terminé un traitement actif et ne présenter aucun signe de mélanome. Pour d’autres, le terme peut désigner toute personne ayant reçu un diagnostic de mélanome.

La Fondation Sauve ta peau souhaite apporter espoir et soutien à toutes les personnes nouvellement diagnostiquées, actuellement sous traitement, ou à celles « en rémission »  – sans aucun signe de maladie. Ce site Web se concentre sur les personnes qui ont généralement terminé un traitement actif et qui sont en rémission ou en traitement d'entretien ; cependant, nous invitons tous les patients atteints de mélanome, à tout stade, à nous contacter.

Nous avons compilé une liste de ressources créées pour soutenir les individus après un diagnostic :

main dans la main.png

MAIN DANS LA MAIN, NOUS LUTTONS ENSEMBLE.

Soins médicaux de suivi

Les survivants du mélanome devraient tous subir des examens médicaux réguliers comprenant un examen des antécédents médicaux du patient et un examen physique. Il est important d’être conscient de tout changement dans votre état de santé ou de tout problème pouvant survenir en raison des traitements contre le cancer. Ces rendez-vous réguliers sont également l’occasion de vérifier les répercussions physiques et émotionnelles qui peuvent survenir des mois ou des années après la fin du traitement.

Savoir à quoi s'attendre après les traitements du mélanome peut vous aider, vous et vos soignants, à modifier votre mode de vie et à prendre d'autres décisions importantes pour l'avenir.

Ressources associées: en anglais seulement
  • What can I do?
    No cancer, including melanomas, can ever be prevented with 100% certainty. The good news with melanomas is that the risk factors are well known, so steps can be taken to dramatically reduce your risk of developing this deadly disease. Always have sunscreen with you so you can apply it whenever an unplanned outdoor activity arises Use a sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30 whenever you are outdoors (even on grayer days) Wear protective clothing with long sleeves, hats, and sunglasses Wear sun safety apparel for added protection Check for changes in moles, new moles and see your doctor immediately if anything is suspicious Limit sun exposure between 10 am and 4 pm Do not use tanning beds
  • Suggested Safety Guidelines
    For outdoor labour occurring on sunny days, especially between 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., workers are encouraged to: ● Work in shaded areas when able ● Wear full-body coverage clothing, including: full-brimmed hats, long-sleeve shirts and full-length pants made of tightly woven fabric that is lightweight ● Wear sun safety apparel for added protection ● Wear full-spectrum sunglasses that protect from UVA and UVB rays ● Apply SPF of 30+ at least twenty minutes before going outside ● Use lip balm that has a SPF of at least 15 Sun protection training and materials should be provided to staff, encouraging them to practice sun safety both on the job and engaging in outdoor pastimes. These guidelines should be communicated and reinforced to employees through verbal reminders, posters, signs, pamphlets, notice, payroll stuffers, newsletters, and meetings.
  • What is SPF?
    What does a sunscreen’s “SPF” rating mean? All sunscreens have a sun protection factor (SPF) on their labels. SPF is a measure of the amount of UV radiation that can reach the skin with sunscreen compared with no sunscreen. For example: SPF 15 filters out approximately 93 percent of all incoming UVB rays. SPF 30 keeps out 97 percent and SPF 50 keeps out 98 percent. No sunscreen can block all UV rays. Broad spectrum sunscreen provides protection from both UVB and UVA rays. In Canada, regulations depict sunscreen labeling for broad spectrum; look for labels that use the words “Broad Spectrum” and show an image of UVA with a circle around it +UVB.
  • Sun Safety and Infants
    Keeping infants and young children out of the sun as much as possible is very important during the first year of a child’s life. There are links between intermittent and intense sun exposure (resulting in burns) in adolescence and the development of skin cancers later in life (“Canadian Cancer Society’s Advisory Committee on Cancer Statistics (2014).Canadian Cancer Statistics 2014. pp. 87.), and skin cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in Canadian youth from 15-35 years old (Canadian Skin Cancer Foundation, “About Skin Cancer”). Regular use of sunscreen with an SPF of 15+ during the first 18 years of life can tremendously reduce the risk of skin cancer. However, before the age of three, sunscreen does not provide adequate protection for developing skin and the best protection is to keep sun exposure to a minimum. Even a suntan is harmful to children, as tanning is an outward sign of internal skin damage.
  • First Aid for Sunburns
    Overexposure to ultraviolet radiation can cause sunburns. Mild sunburns can be treated, however severe sunburns require medical attention. Here is some advice for treating a mild sunburn: ● Avoid creams or lotions that may hold heat inside the skin or may contain numbing medication (i.e. Benzocaine or lidocaine) ● Use of Aloe Vera ● Do not wash burned skin with harsh soap ● For pain relief, you may use ibuprofen or acetaminophen, as directed ● Do not give aspirin to children ● Cover all sunburned areas In the case of a severe sunburn, seek medical attention. Symptoms include: ● Sunburn that forms blisters or is extremely painful ● Facial swelling ● Nausea, fever or severe chills ● Pale or cool skin ● Rapid pulse or rapid breathing ● Headache, confusion or a feeling of faintness or dizziness ● Signs of dehydration (increased thirst, dry eyes and mouth, no urine output) ● Signs of skin infection (increasing redness, warmth, pain, swelling, or pus) ● Eyes that hurt and are sensitive to light
  • Tanning Beds & Lamps
    Tanning beds and sun lamps release UV rays that can cause sunburns, damage skin and increase the risk of skin cancer. People at tanning salons may tell you their lights are safe, but the fact is their lights may give from 10 to 15 times as much UVA as the sun. Many studies have demonstrated that the risk of developing cutaneous melanoma can increase up to 75% when tanning devices are used before the age of 35.
  • UV Rays & Your Skin
    While sunlight has health benefits, it is important to take precautions to protect ourselves from potentially harmful UV rays. During the Winter and Spring months, it is important to protect yourself while pursuing snow sports, such as skiing, snowboarding, or snowshoeing. The sun’s reflection off of snow can increase the amount of UV radiation you receive by up to 85%. Wearing sunscreen and sunglasses will help protect exposed areas. It is recommended that you take the same precautions during Summer water sports. An SPF30 is the minimum protection recommended, and sunscreen should be applied twenty minutes before heading outdoors to allow for activation time. Remember to reapply every two hours, or after swimming or perspiring. When you are unsure of the UV strength on a particular day, it is useful to consult the UV index. The UV index is a simplified measurement system for the sun’s damaging rays and a guideline to protection. These are available online and as phone apps. The UV index measures as follows: ● 0-2 – Low Risk – minimal sun protection required (unless near water or snow). Wear sunglasses if bright. ● 3-5 – Moderate Risk – take precautions – wear sunscreen, sunhat, sunglasses, seek shade during peak hours of 11 am to 4 pm. ● 6-7 – High Risk – wear sun protective clothing, sunscreen, and seek shade. ● 8-10 – Avoid the sun – seek shade – wear sun protective clothing, sun screen & sunglasses. White sand increases UV radiation exposure. ● 11 + – Take full precautions. Unprotected skin can burn in minutes. Avoid the sun between 11 am and 4 pm, wear sunscreens & sun protective clothing.
  • The Sun & Your Eyes
    Sunglasses help to protect your eyes from the sun’s ultraviolet radiation and bright light. Because UV rays carry more energy and are invisible, the eye is at greater risk of damage from UV rays. UVA and UVB rays can cause or speed up several diseases of the eye or its supporting structures and because they occur over a long time, they may happen surreptitiously and are irreversible. During water or snow exposure, it is important to block out blue light. Medium to dark sunglass lenses with a grey, green, or brown tint will block out most blue light. Intensive daily exposure, such as outdoor work, requires a higher level of protection from sunglasses. Daytime driving: general purpose sunglasses are considered sufficient protection during daylight driving. The industry is self-regulated and has three categories of sunglasses: ● cosmetic sunglasses with lightly tinted lenses ● general purpose sunglasses with higher protection levels of all light ● special purpose sunglasses provide the highest protection, but are too dark for driving
  • Physical VS Chemical Filter
    There are many sunscreens on the market, but the most effective ones contain both UVA and UVB protection, known as broad spectrum protection. There are two different types of UV filters found in Sunscreens: Chemical filters: work by absorbing, scattering and reflecting UV radiation. These chemical filters are absorbed by the skin and work from within. This is why they must be applied 15-20 minutes before going in the sun – to give the filters time to be absorbed into your skin so that they can do their job. You will find a wide array of UVB filters used among sunscreen manufacturers, but there are fewer UVA filters available. Physical filters: work by absorbing, scattering and reflecting UV radiation. Physical filters remain on the surface of the skin and are not absorbed. Physical filters are comprised of Zinc Oxide or Titanium Dioxide.
  • Extreme Heat
    Although Canada is not often thought as a sunny country, the reality is that many Canadian cities experience heat waves during the summer months. During heat waves, high temperatures close to 40 degrees can be reached, which can be dangerous for your health (causing illnesses like heat stroke, and even death). You need to be very careful and follow some steps to protect yourself.
Follow Up MedicalCare
Physical Changes
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Changements physiques

Retour au sommet

Même si vous avez reçu le même diagnostic de mélanome ou le même traitement qu’une autre personne, votre expérience post-traitement peut être très différente. Votre médecin devrait vous parler des effets à long terme de votre traitement spécifique contre le cancer.

Certains des changements physiques les plus courants signalés par les gens sont :

  • Fatigue

  • Modifications de la mémoire et de la concentration

  • Douleur

  • Modifications du système nerveux

  • Lymphœdème ou gonflement

  • Problèmes de bouche et de dents

  • Modifications du poids et des habitudes alimentaires

  • Difficulté à avaler

  • Problèmes de contrôle de la vessie ou des intestins

  • Symptômes de la ménopause

 

Votre médecin peut vous aider à gérer et à contrôler bon nombre de ces changements. Parlez à votre médecin dès les premiers signes de problèmes que vous rencontrez.

FamilyIssues
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Problèmes familiaux

Retour au sommet

Lorsque le traitement prend fin, les familles ne sont parfois pas préparées au temps que peut prendre le rétablissement. En tant que survivant, vous avez toujours besoin de soutien et cela peut être difficile à comprendre pour votre famille et vos amis. Souvent, la guérison dure plus longtemps que votre traitement, ce qui peut susciter inquiétude et frustration chez tout le monde. Il peut également être difficile pour vos amis et votre famille de comprendre le soutien dont vous aurez besoin en tant que survivant.

Votre rétablissement après le traitement et votre vie de survivant sont des expériences personnelles qu’il faut du temps pour comprendre. Soyez honnête avec vous-même et avec les autres, et n'ayez pas peur de demander de l'aide. Il sera utile à vous et à vos proches de les tenir informés de votre cancer et de les impliquer dans votre rétablissement.

Voici quelques problèmes courants que les gens ont partagés avec nous :

Les gens s’attendent à ce que vous retrouviez ce que vous étiez avant le cancer.

La réalité est que vous n’êtes probablement plus physiquement ou émotionnellement ce que vous étiez avant le cancer et que vous n’êtes plus capable de faire tout ce que vous faisiez autrefois. Vous y parviendrez peut-être un jour – mais cela pourrait prendre des mois, voire des années. Il est important d'être patient et d'être ouvert et honnête avec les autres sur ce que vous pouvez et ne pouvez pas faire.

Vous avez toujours besoin du soutien de vos amis et de votre famille.

Cela ne semble pas poser de problème, mais les survivants se sentent souvent coupables de demander de l'aide lorsqu'ils sont en convalescence ou en rémission. Il est courant de penser que les autres ont déjà fait tant de choses et de se sentir coupable de demander davantage d'aide. Cependant, dans la plupart des cas, le fait de faire participer vos proches à votre rétablissement et à votre vie après le cancer continue de rendre tout le monde plus fort.

Vous attendez plus de vos proches que ce que vous recevez.

Votre famille et vos amis pourraient vous décevoir, ce qui peut être frustrant. L’attention que vous avez reçue pendant le traitement peut avoir diminué depuis la fin de votre traitement actif. Soyez ouvert et honnête avec vos proches sur ce que vous ressentez et demandez du soutien et de l'aide lorsque vous en avez besoin.

Comprendre la dynamique des relations de survie.

En même temps que vous vous remettez physiquement et émotionnellement des montagnes russes du mélanome, votre famille s’adapte également. Les proches sont encore aux prises avec le stress et les changements que le cancer a entraînés pour tout le monde. Eux aussi ont besoin de temps pour comprendre ce qu’ils ont vécu et de quel soutien ils pourraient avoir besoin en tant qu’aidants. Il peut être difficile pour la famille et les amis d’exprimer leurs sentiments ou de savoir comment parler de ce que chacun a vécu. Il est important de demander l'aide d'un professionnel si votre famille ou vos amis estiment avoir besoin d'un soutien extérieur. Demandez à votre médecin de vous orienter vers un conseiller ou un expert en matière de préoccupations familiales après un cancer.

Ressources associées:

FAQ's

Questions fréquemment posées

Retour au sommet

  • What can I do?
    No cancer, including melanomas, can ever be prevented with 100% certainty. The good news with melanomas is that the risk factors are well known, so steps can be taken to dramatically reduce your risk of developing this deadly disease. Always have sunscreen with you so you can apply it whenever an unplanned outdoor activity arises Use a sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30 whenever you are outdoors (even on grayer days) Wear protective clothing with long sleeves, hats, and sunglasses Wear sun safety apparel for added protection Check for changes in moles, new moles and see your doctor immediately if anything is suspicious Limit sun exposure between 10 am and 4 pm Do not use tanning beds
  • Suggested Safety Guidelines
    For outdoor labour occurring on sunny days, especially between 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., workers are encouraged to: ● Work in shaded areas when able ● Wear full-body coverage clothing, including: full-brimmed hats, long-sleeve shirts and full-length pants made of tightly woven fabric that is lightweight ● Wear sun safety apparel for added protection ● Wear full-spectrum sunglasses that protect from UVA and UVB rays ● Apply SPF of 30+ at least twenty minutes before going outside ● Use lip balm that has a SPF of at least 15 Sun protection training and materials should be provided to staff, encouraging them to practice sun safety both on the job and engaging in outdoor pastimes. These guidelines should be communicated and reinforced to employees through verbal reminders, posters, signs, pamphlets, notice, payroll stuffers, newsletters, and meetings.
  • What is SPF?
    What does a sunscreen’s “SPF” rating mean? All sunscreens have a sun protection factor (SPF) on their labels. SPF is a measure of the amount of UV radiation that can reach the skin with sunscreen compared with no sunscreen. For example: SPF 15 filters out approximately 93 percent of all incoming UVB rays. SPF 30 keeps out 97 percent and SPF 50 keeps out 98 percent. No sunscreen can block all UV rays. Broad spectrum sunscreen provides protection from both UVB and UVA rays. In Canada, regulations depict sunscreen labeling for broad spectrum; look for labels that use the words “Broad Spectrum” and show an image of UVA with a circle around it +UVB.
  • Sun Safety and Infants
    Keeping infants and young children out of the sun as much as possible is very important during the first year of a child’s life. There are links between intermittent and intense sun exposure (resulting in burns) in adolescence and the development of skin cancers later in life (“Canadian Cancer Society’s Advisory Committee on Cancer Statistics (2014).Canadian Cancer Statistics 2014. pp. 87.), and skin cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in Canadian youth from 15-35 years old (Canadian Skin Cancer Foundation, “About Skin Cancer”). Regular use of sunscreen with an SPF of 15+ during the first 18 years of life can tremendously reduce the risk of skin cancer. However, before the age of three, sunscreen does not provide adequate protection for developing skin and the best protection is to keep sun exposure to a minimum. Even a suntan is harmful to children, as tanning is an outward sign of internal skin damage.
  • First Aid for Sunburns
    Overexposure to ultraviolet radiation can cause sunburns. Mild sunburns can be treated, however severe sunburns require medical attention. Here is some advice for treating a mild sunburn: ● Avoid creams or lotions that may hold heat inside the skin or may contain numbing medication (i.e. Benzocaine or lidocaine) ● Use of Aloe Vera ● Do not wash burned skin with harsh soap ● For pain relief, you may use ibuprofen or acetaminophen, as directed ● Do not give aspirin to children ● Cover all sunburned areas In the case of a severe sunburn, seek medical attention. Symptoms include: ● Sunburn that forms blisters or is extremely painful ● Facial swelling ● Nausea, fever or severe chills ● Pale or cool skin ● Rapid pulse or rapid breathing ● Headache, confusion or a feeling of faintness or dizziness ● Signs of dehydration (increased thirst, dry eyes and mouth, no urine output) ● Signs of skin infection (increasing redness, warmth, pain, swelling, or pus) ● Eyes that hurt and are sensitive to light
  • Tanning Beds & Lamps
    Tanning beds and sun lamps release UV rays that can cause sunburns, damage skin and increase the risk of skin cancer. People at tanning salons may tell you their lights are safe, but the fact is their lights may give from 10 to 15 times as much UVA as the sun. Many studies have demonstrated that the risk of developing cutaneous melanoma can increase up to 75% when tanning devices are used before the age of 35.
  • UV Rays & Your Skin
    While sunlight has health benefits, it is important to take precautions to protect ourselves from potentially harmful UV rays. During the Winter and Spring months, it is important to protect yourself while pursuing snow sports, such as skiing, snowboarding, or snowshoeing. The sun’s reflection off of snow can increase the amount of UV radiation you receive by up to 85%. Wearing sunscreen and sunglasses will help protect exposed areas. It is recommended that you take the same precautions during Summer water sports. An SPF30 is the minimum protection recommended, and sunscreen should be applied twenty minutes before heading outdoors to allow for activation time. Remember to reapply every two hours, or after swimming or perspiring. When you are unsure of the UV strength on a particular day, it is useful to consult the UV index. The UV index is a simplified measurement system for the sun’s damaging rays and a guideline to protection. These are available online and as phone apps. The UV index measures as follows: ● 0-2 – Low Risk – minimal sun protection required (unless near water or snow). Wear sunglasses if bright. ● 3-5 – Moderate Risk – take precautions – wear sunscreen, sunhat, sunglasses, seek shade during peak hours of 11 am to 4 pm. ● 6-7 – High Risk – wear sun protective clothing, sunscreen, and seek shade. ● 8-10 – Avoid the sun – seek shade – wear sun protective clothing, sun screen & sunglasses. White sand increases UV radiation exposure. ● 11 + – Take full precautions. Unprotected skin can burn in minutes. Avoid the sun between 11 am and 4 pm, wear sunscreens & sun protective clothing.
  • The Sun & Your Eyes
    Sunglasses help to protect your eyes from the sun’s ultraviolet radiation and bright light. Because UV rays carry more energy and are invisible, the eye is at greater risk of damage from UV rays. UVA and UVB rays can cause or speed up several diseases of the eye or its supporting structures and because they occur over a long time, they may happen surreptitiously and are irreversible. During water or snow exposure, it is important to block out blue light. Medium to dark sunglass lenses with a grey, green, or brown tint will block out most blue light. Intensive daily exposure, such as outdoor work, requires a higher level of protection from sunglasses. Daytime driving: general purpose sunglasses are considered sufficient protection during daylight driving. The industry is self-regulated and has three categories of sunglasses: ● cosmetic sunglasses with lightly tinted lenses ● general purpose sunglasses with higher protection levels of all light ● special purpose sunglasses provide the highest protection, but are too dark for driving
  • Physical VS Chemical Filter
    There are many sunscreens on the market, but the most effective ones contain both UVA and UVB protection, known as broad spectrum protection. There are two different types of UV filters found in Sunscreens: Chemical filters: work by absorbing, scattering and reflecting UV radiation. These chemical filters are absorbed by the skin and work from within. This is why they must be applied 15-20 minutes before going in the sun – to give the filters time to be absorbed into your skin so that they can do their job. You will find a wide array of UVB filters used among sunscreen manufacturers, but there are fewer UVA filters available. Physical filters: work by absorbing, scattering and reflecting UV radiation. Physical filters remain on the surface of the skin and are not absorbed. Physical filters are comprised of Zinc Oxide or Titanium Dioxide.
  • Extreme Heat
    Although Canada is not often thought as a sunny country, the reality is that many Canadian cities experience heat waves during the summer months. During heat waves, high temperatures close to 40 degrees can be reached, which can be dangerous for your health (causing illnesses like heat stroke, and even death). You need to be very careful and follow some steps to protect yourself.

REMARQUE : les informations figurant sur le site Web Sauve ta peau ne sont pas destinées à remplacer l'avis médical d'un médecin ou d'un professionnel de la santé. Bien que nous fassions tout notre possible pour garantir que les informations sur notre site soient aussi actuelles que possible, veuillez noter que les informations et les statistiques sont susceptibles de changer à mesure que de nouvelles recherches et études sont publiées.

100% des dons vont aux patients

Il est crucial de rendre la sensibilisation et l’éducation accessibles. Depuis 2006, la Fondation œuvre à la sensibilisation aux cancers de la peau mélanomes et non mélanomes en mettant l'accent sur l'éducation, la prévention et la nécessité d'améliorer les soins aux patients.

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